12:30-12:45

Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) in Pig and Chicken in Viet Nam

Presenter : Pawin Padungtod
Abstract ID : A019
POSTER
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a multi-dimensional threat to public health and to the overall sustainable economic development of the country. AMR is a growing human and economic threat in Viet Nam with the increased and uncontrolled use of antimicrobials in human health as well as in livestock and fish production aimed at growth promotion, disease prevention and control. The Government of Viet Nam’s Department of Animal Health (DAH), in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and Oxford University Clinical Research Unit (OUCRU), implemented a surveillance system with the goal to provide an unbiased assessment of the levels of AMR in pig and chicken production in Viet Nam. The surveillance system focused on pig and chicken production with samples collected from abattoirs or slaughter points. The principles around the sampling scheme are based on randomisation of sampling in relation to each production type. OUCRU provided training to staff of the National Centre for Veterinary Hygiene and Inspection (NCVHI) on bacterial isolation and AMR testing, and to relevant NCVHI/SDAH staff on field sampling. The standard operation protocols (SOP) for laboratory testing developed based on the training and pilot surveillance in Hanoi have been approved by DAH. A total of seven pig slaughterhouse and seven chicken slaughter points in Hanoi, Hai Phong, Quang Ninh, Long An and Ho Chi Minh City were selected based on average number of animals processed per day. In each slaughter house, the surveillance team collected 2 swabs from each of the 25 randomly selected animals. Isolation, identification of E.coli, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) and susceptibility testing using disk diffusion assay were performed according to Protocol established by DAH – Vietnam FAO for National Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Program in Livestock (September 2017).

Poster Slot

A01

12:30-12:45

Networks of Communication During the Multi-Organizational Response to the January 2017 H5N8 Zoonotic Disease Outbreak in Uganda

Presenter : Steven Ssendagire
Abstract ID : A017
POSTER

Poster Slot

B01

12:30-12:45

Costing Tool for Global Health Security

Presenter : Rebecca Katz
Abstract ID : A045
POSTER

Poster Slot

C01

12:30-12:45

Building Resilience to Emerging Infectious Diseases: Political and Governance Lessons from Eradicating Polio

Presenter : Stephen Matlin
Abstract ID : A070
POSTER
The Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has been the longest, largest, most complex and expensive global health initiative in history. With eradication imminent, we have been undertaking a case study of political and governance aspects. The lessons from the polio eradication effort offer substantial opportunities for learning, concerning how to prepare for and respond to emerging infectious diseases. These include insights into: • the relative merits of parallel versus integrated programming from a variety of perspectives, including how to create and sustain strong political will, resource allocation and effective governance mechanisms; • the effectiveness of complex governance structures such as that of the GPEI, bridging governmental and non-governmental partners; and the value of monitoring, oversight and governance components such as the Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) and partners' structures (e.g. Polio Oversight Board, Polio Partners’ Group); • the value and limitations of the International Health Regulations and declaration of a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC); • the need for resilience and containment and the political and strategic challenges in maintaining these critical capacities when the disease itself is not a present, visible threat; • the importance of early establishment of policies and strategic plans for exit from infectious disease control programmes and for the transitioning of capacities from dedicated programmes to country-based integrated systems; • the value of learning from experience in disease control and eradication programmes. Lessons will be emphasized that relate to country-level action and to regional and global actors. The importance of linkage of specific, infectious disease-focused initiatives to wider global health objectives (such as routine immunization, universal health coverage and the Global Health Security Agenda) will be stressed.

Poster Slot

D01

12:30-12:45

Strengthening Preparedness to Arbovirus Infections in Mediterranean and Black Sea Countries: The Medilabsecure Effort towards the Integrated Surveillance in the Context of One Health Strategy.

Presenter : Maria Grazia Dente
Abstract ID : A242
POSTER
Maria Grazia DENTE1, Flavia RICCARDO1 , Francesco BOLICI2and Silvia DECLICH1 on behalf of the MeSa Working Group 1: Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma- Italy 2: University of Cassino, Italy MediLabSecure network (http://www.medilabsecure.com/project.html), established in 2014 following the EpiSouth Projects (http://www.episouthnetwork.org/), comprises 55 laboratories and 19 public health institutions in 19 non-EU countries in the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions (Albania, Algeria, Armenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Egypt, Georgia, Jordan, Kosovo, Lebanon, Libya, Moldova, Montenegro, Morocco, Palestine, Former Yugoslavic Republic of Macedonia, Serbia, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine). This One Health project develops through the transdisciplinary interaction of four sectors: human health, animal health, medical entomology and public health, to enhance preparedness and response to emerging arboviroses and to improve integration of surveillance. To this aim, we implemented a MediLabSecure Situation Analysis (MeSa study) on integrated surveillance (IS) of West Nile Virus in Tunisia and Serbia and of Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever in Georgia, describing the level of integration of the systems with criteria included in a framework we proposed to assess and compare IS (http://www.simetweb.eu/document/3847). The MeSa had the following objectives: 1. Describe how the collection, analysis and dissemination/exchange of information is organized within and between human, animal and entomological surveillance of arboviruses; 2. Identify formal procedures and informal practices for IS; 3. Discuss main challenges and success stories in establishing a functional inter-sectoral collaboration and integrating sectorial surveillances. In the period July-December 2016 we collected background information on the IS of the three countries, visited the countries’ institutions and conducted interviews with the relevant stakeholders. Surveillance processes (intra/inter sectorial) with flows of information, samples, feedback and responsibilities were analized in the three countries. The results highlight that the added value of IS and its aim/s (early warning, mitigation, response, etc.) may vary in accordance with the context, the available resources, and the pathogens. This should be considered when planning for IS and in the evaluation of One Health strategies.

Poster Slot

E01

12:30-12:45

Enhancing Prevention, Detection and Response to Zoonoses and AMR Through Transformations of One Health Workforce in Tanzania

Presenter : Robinson Mdegela
Abstract ID : A164
POSTER
Tanzania with a rapid increase of human population, has about 44% of unprecedented land protected for wildlife and nature conservation. The interphase and protected areas are suitable for settlement, a risk factor for high interactions between human, domestic and wild animals leading to high prevalence of zonnoses and emergence of AMR. Since early 1990’s, Tanzania has been in transition and transformation from health professional and workforce working in silos to collaborations using one health approach in order enhance prevention, detection and responses of zoonoses and AMR. The main objective of this paper is to review One Health Initiatives that have been implemented in Tanzania in view to harnesses the power of PPC partnerships for prevention, detection and responses to zoonoses and AMR. To accomplish the task, relevant documents for OH in Tanzania were reviewed. Information gathered was grouped and discussed to reflect the relevancy in Public Private Community (PPC) partnership domains. Public domain: The advocacy for One Health in Tanzania has been at the highest level by involving the President, Prime Minister and Ministers in line Ministries. thus, the OH Tanzania was launched by the Vice President of the United Republic of Tanzania. Coordination of all OH activities is done by the One Health Coordination Unit (OHCU) at the Prime Ministers Office. There is OH leadership training for inservice personnel through Continuous Professional Development (CPDs) and table top simulation exercises relevant to OH approach. Curricular for pre-service personnel undergraduate and graduate levels have been revised to integrate the OH issues in the curricular as well as in OH modules. Private domain: Evidenced by involvement of NGO’s, media and private firms that provide financial and material support to OH student clubs that among others include vaccines and pharmaceuticals. Community domain: Although the OHCU works at National level, at community level, there are One Health Committees that co-ordinates and implement activities at Regional and District levels. In terms of training, through OHCEA, curricula and OH module for training para-professionals (diploma and certificate holders) working at community level are now being developed. One Health Student Club use OH approach to sensitise and educate the primary school children about zoonoses and AMR. The same club also use OH to control rabies through community education and vaccination of dogs. Overall, there is serious commitment and engagements and involvement of WHO, OIE and FAO. A Network of One Health Networks in Tanzania meets once a year to share experiences and best practices of capacity building and implementing activities using OH approach. In conclusion, One Health approach is key for harnessing the power of PPC partnership for Prevention, Detection and Responses to zoonotic diseases and AMR.

Poster Slot

F01

12:45-13:00

EpiCore: Crowdsourcing Global Epidemic Intelligence to Verify Outbreaks Faster

Presenter : Mark Smolinski
Abstract ID : A280
POSTER
Background: In 2013, the Skoll Global Threats Fund partnered with three leading health organizations to create EpiCore – a robust global community of human, animal, and environmental health professionals committed verifying disease outbreaks. EpiCore’s online platform was launched in November 2015, and operates under a simple premise: connecting more health professionals to a system that provides immediate access to early alerts about health threats in their area and allowing users to validate those threats as real—leads to faster, accurate outbreak verification. How EpiCore Works: Through a secure online platform, members are able to easily and quickly provide local information to expedite outbreak verification. Moderators review reports of potential outbreaks in humans or animals from disparate sources and then use EpiCore to send requests for information (RFI) to volunteers, so that signals can be verified. Volunteers combine their expertise, knowledge of on-the-ground realities, and other resources to verify or discard early indicators of an outbreak. They report back to moderators, who assimilate responses and share their findings with the global disease surveillance community. EpiCore volunteer applications are vetted to ensure that they possess the public health and epidemiologic expertise necessary to contribute to the platform. EpiCore has over 2040 members that span 143 countries. During the two years since EpiCore’s launch, over 500 requests for information to volunteers have been posted with a response rate of over 60%. Looking Ahead: With its broad geographical distribution of members and high response rate, EpiCore is poised to enable verification of potential outbreak signals faster. By improving situational awareness and de-escalating rumors or false information, EpiCore is able to reduce the signal-to-noise ratio among disease surveillance data streams. By detecting and verifying outbreaks faster, EpiCore can enable early outbreak response efforts that curb epidemics and save lives.

Poster Slot

A02

12:45-13:00

Epicore: Initial Experience With An Innovative System For Outbreak Verification

Presenter : Larry Madoff
Abstract ID : A292
POSTER
Objective: To understand the performance of the EpiCore platform and evaluate its usefulness in obtaining information regarding potential public health outbreaks. Methods: Volunteer human, animal, and environmental health professionals from around the world are recruited and trained to provide early verification of health threat alerts in their geographic region through a secure, easy to use, online platform. Experts in the area of emerging infectious diseases send requests for information on unverified health threats to these volunteers who combine their on-the-ground knowledge and professional expertise to verify outbreak alerts to respond to those requests. Experts review and summarize responses and rapidly disseminate important information to the global health community through existing event-based disease surveillance networks such as ProMED. Findings: From March 2016 to September 2017, 2068 EpiCore volunteers from 142 countries were trained in methods for informal disease surveillance and the use of the secure EpiCore online platform. These volunteers provided 799 individual responses to 759 requests for information addressing unverified health threats in 112 countries. 61% of requests for information received at least one member response. Most responses were received within hours of the requests. 45% of responses were considered of high significance. These responses led to 194 ProMED posts with over 50% of responses supporting verification of an outbreak and were published on ProMED, an existing outbreak reporting network with more than 85,000 members. Conclusion: There is widespread willingness among health professionals around the world to voluntarily assist efforts to verify and provide supporting information on unconfirmed health threats in their region. By linking this worldwide member network of health experts through a secure online reporting platform, EpiCore enables faster global outbreak detection and reporting.

Poster Slot

B02

12:45-13:00

Ongoing PREDICT 2 Work in Lao PDR: Synchronized Surveillance Between PREDICT and FAO at the Wildlife-Livestock-Human Interface.

Presenter : Soubanh Silithammavong
Abstract ID : A175
POSTER

Poster Slot

C02

12:45-13:00

Prioritization of Disease Emergence Risk Factors for the Republic of Korea Using a Nationwide Survey of Subject Matter Experts: A Model for Other Countries or Regions

Presenter : Jonathan Sleeman
Abstract ID : A020
POSTER
Emerging diseases are driven by multiple factors including, but not limited to, climate and land use change, population growth, global travel and trade, and increasing agricultural intensification. The relative importance of these drivers may vary among geographic regions, and simultaneously managing multiple risk factors for disease emergence may be prohibitively expensive. Consequently, prioritizing the risk factors for disease emergence is warranted. We used an online nationwide questionnaire survey of subject matter experts to elicit opinions on likely pathways of wildlife-associated disease or pathogen introduction into the Republic of Korea (ROK), and risk factors for disease emergence and spread within the country. To examine the experts’ perceived risk we used a Bayesian, multivariate normal order-statistics model. Experts identified migration of wildlife, international human movement, and illegal importation of wildlife as the three primary routes posing the greatest risk of disease or pathogen introduction into ROK. Proximity of humans, livestock and wildlife was the most significant risk factor for promoting the spread of wildlife-associated diseases or pathogens within the country, followed by high density of livestock populations, habitat loss and environmental degradation, and climate change. There was also general agreement among the three sectors of expertise (public health, agriculture, and environmental) regarding the relative importance of these external and internal risk factors. This provides evidence of progress towards an interdisciplinary approach, and the concurrence across sectors regarding risks for disease emergence provides an important basis for establishing an effective multi-sector, One Health approach in ROK. This ultimately allows decision makers to use evidence-based priority setting when allocating resources to address disease risks. This study provided a rapid, cost-effective method of assessment of disease emergence risk factors for which the published literature is sparse, and may be useful for other countries or regions that wish to conduct similar risk assessments.

Poster Slot

D02

12:45-13:00

Academic-Public Health-Community Partnership for Prevention and Control of Intestinal Parasites Infection in Endemic Area Using One Health Approach: A Field Observational Research

Presenter : Aulia Pawestri
Abstract ID : A026
POSTER
Intestinal parasites are prevalent in low socio-economic tropical regions, especially among immigrant and refugee communities. Tha Song Yang district at Thai-Myanmar border, Tak Province, has one of the highest intestinal parasites prevalence in Thailand. This study aimed to determine the true intestinal parasites prevalence and assess possible contributing risk factors. From these results, target-specific and sustainable plans involving multi-sectors were formulated. To determine prevalence of intestinal parasites, we collected 513 human fecal samples from six Tha Song Yang sub-districts. To assess zoonotic and water-borne transmission, we retrieved domestic animal fecal samples, and up-, middle-, and down-stream water samples. Disease-associated knowledge and attitude towards risk factors and prevention were evaluated by questionnaires. By strong collaboration from the Ministry of Interior (MOI) and Ministry of Public Health (MOPH), we, as the academic sector, facilitated multi-sectorial brainstorming among villagers, health volunteers, sub-district administrative officer, and public health sectors, including health care providers and public health authorities, to explore perceptions on important disease-associated risks and solutions. Microscopic examination of human fecal samples revealed that 65% was positive for intestinal protozoa and 5% for helminthes. Interestingly, 90% of domestic animal fecal samples showed infective forms of intestinal parasites similar to those of human. However, correlation of these parasites in human and animal was still inconclusive. Questionnaire analysis indicated that 70% respondents have no knowledge about disease-associated risk factors and prevention. Multi-sectorial brain storming displayed water-related problems as the most prevailing risk, followed by improper waste management, unclean food, and poor personal hygiene. Crystallized ideas to solve these problems focused on the necessity of assistance from local authorities to improve water quality and waste management. These suggestions, combined with our technical findings, were constituted into a policy brief and notified to MOI/MOPH for further policy and strategic planning for community participation in reducing disease burden.

Poster Slot

E02

12:45-13:00

Assessing the Strength of One Health University Networks though Social Network Analysis

Presenter : Ian Allen
Abstract ID : A291
POSTER

Poster Slot

F02

13:00-13:15

Strengthened Public Health Laboratories Improve Disease Surveillance in the East African Community

Presenter : Willy Were
Abstract ID : A346
POSTER
Background: The East Africa Public Health Laboratory Networking Project, approved by the World Bank in 2010, aims to establish a network of high quality, efficient and accessible laboratories in remote cross-border areas of five of the East African Community Partner States (Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda). The laboratories are contributing to enhanced detection of infectious diseases in remote trans-boundary regions in line with commitments under the International Health Regulations and East African Integrated Disease Surveillance Network (EAIDSNet). Process: Central public health laboratories and 36 public and private satellite laboratories in peri-border regions were built/renovated, equipped, and connected. All were enrolled in a continuous laboratory improvement program based on WHO-tailored Stepwise Laboratory Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA). “One Health” multi-disciplinary cross-border disease surveillance teams were established; simulation exercises for health emergencies were conducted; regional print and electronic systems for sharing disease surveillance data were established; training of over 13,000 personnel in disease surveillance, novel diagnostic lab techniques and specimen handling was conducted; an operational research program was conducted, including mapping of antimicrobial resistance (AMR); and improved capacity established to conduct lab-based AMR and cancer surveillance in the region. Outcomes: The quality of laboratory performance has improved with >96% of the labs attaining >=2 SLIPTA stars, 63% >=3 stars in 2017 compared to 23% with 2 stars in 2011; 4 laboratories were accredited using ISO15189 standards, one to supranational TB referral lab status; 956 MDR diagnoses have been made; beneficiaries of the labs have increased from 947,207 in 2011to 4,038,178 in 2016; 22 joint One Health cross-border disease surveillance review/outbreak investigations have helped to contain several disease outbreaks; and the proportion of outbreaks confirmed by laboratory testing increased from 10-20% in 2010 to 100% in 2016. Conclusion: Laboratory improvements could form an efficient gateway to enhanced regional disease control efforts.

Poster Slot

A03

13:00-13:15

Developing Public Programs on Emerging Infectious Diseases at the Smithsonian Institution: Lessons for Pandemic Risk Communication

Presenter : Sabrina Sholts
Abstract ID : A285
POSTER

Poster Slot

B03

13:00-13:15

Safe Poultry Slaughter Mitigate the Risk of Human Exposure to H5 HPAI at Household Sectors in Egypt

Presenter : A. Lotfi Allal
Abstract ID : A022
POSTER

Poster Slot

C03

13:00-13:15

Afyadata: A Set of Digital, One Health, Community-Based Tools for Reporting of Emerging Infectious Diseases

Presenter : Esron Karimuribo
Abstract ID : A321
POSTER

Poster Slot

D03

13:00-13:15

Pre-empting the Compatibility Problem: How Multisectoral Cooperation Can Weaken Responses to EIDS and What To Do About It

Presenter : Mara Pillinger
Abstract ID : A136
POSTER
Over the past two decades, multisectoral partnerships (MSPs) (also called public-private partnerships) have become the go-to approach in global health governance. So, in the wake of Ebola, it is no surprise that new MSPs are being created at every level to address emerging infectious diseases. When setting up MSPs, members tend to focus on programmatic goals and strategies more than on how the partnerships will operate as organizations. Yet success and sustainability hinge on these organizational dynamics. We therefore need to ask: what are the organizational obstacles to effective multisectoral cooperation? And how can partnership members avoid or manage these challenges? Drawing on data gathered from seven MSPs, I show that “compatibility problems” are a key obstacle for sustaining multisectoral collaboration. MSPs bring together organizations from different sectors that are used to operating in very different ways, with different standards of success and legitimacy, organizational cultures, rules and processes, etc. So even where members share goals, making MSPs run smoothly is like trying to link computers with different operating systems. Compatibility problems are particularly critical for multisectoral collaboration around emerging infectious disease. By definition, these MSPs must consistently operate in stressful crisis or pre-crises circumstances, which is precisely when organizational tensions are likely to be most acute and MSPs can least afford to deal with them. I further show that compatibility problems are underpinned by fundamental organizational tensions in members’ priorities and expectations for the partnership. Examples include tensions over whether to prioritize outputs vs. inputs, whether the MSP should operate as an actor or a forum, and whether performance problems are due to poor execution or inconsistent expectations. Finally, I share tips and best practices for managing compatibility problems and organizational tensions.

Poster Slot

E03

13:00-13:15

Flu Near You: Crowdsourcing Influenza-Like Illness Reporting in the United States

Presenter : Emily Cohn
Abstract ID : A185
POSTER
The United States Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that influenza sickened over 24 million people, and resulted in the deaths of nearly 12,000 in the United States during the 2015-2016 influenza season. While vaccination remains one of the best defenses against it, early detection is crucial to halting its spread. Recognizing symptoms early can allow public health officials, and the communities they serve, to take steps to reduce transmission. This is why we created Flu Near You, an online participatory disease surveillance system that allows volunteers in the United States and Canada to report their health information using a brief weekly survey. The system collects symptom data, which it publishes to the website, and offers an interface to compare its data with data from the CDC. A comparison of Flu Near You weekly symptom report data to the CDC’s Influenza-like Illness Network, has shown a correlation of up to 0.96 at the national level and correlations ranging from 0.8-0.9 at the regional level depending on the specific flu season. This high degree of correlation shows the Flu Near You successfully captures disease trends in the community. While Flu Near You has utilized influenza as a case study for participatory surveillance, the project team aims to expand symptoms and disease coverage for future application. With the increase in the emergence of infectious diseases over the last few decades, the application of this technology and crowdsourcing methods may prove useful in broader early disease detection. We hope this expansion will further provide actionable insights for public health stakeholders, and be able to account for and track other emergent diseases such as Zika virus and dengue.

Poster Slot

F03

16:30-16:45

System Review of Regulations on Antibiotic Use in Food Animals and a Case Study on Stakeholders’ Concern on Broiler Farm in Northwestern China

Presenter : Jingyi Xu
Abstract ID : A181
POSTER
 Background: Antibiotic resistance has become one of the biggest threats to global health. The overuse in animals, especially as a growth promoter have made great contribution to the increasing rates. The resistant bacteria transmit through food and water environment forms a cumulative problem for human health. China uses around half the world's antibiotics, of which 52% in agricultural sector. But China does not have restrictions on antimicrobial growth promoters. The issues need to be highly addressed. Over goal and Objective: This study aims to review and analysis the regulations on antibiotics use in food animals, investigating the perceptions and behaviors of stakeholders on antibiotic use on broiler farm and their influence and impact on the regulations of antibiotic use in food animals. Methods: This study combines Quantitative and qualitative methods together and is conducting in northwestern China. Centering around the antibiotic use regulations, the study includes three parts: A policy system review, a case study and a cross-sectional survey. Result: After a few parts of pilot study, we found that regulations and surveillance are theoretically feasible, but difficulty in being in operation, the work is often a formality. The quarantine of broilers is very limited due to lack of personnel and techniques. People haven’t realized the risk of ATB resistance from environment. The ATB resistance due to food animals has not yet be taken seriously comparing with human use in hospital. Conclusion: Regulation should be considered to get rid of the control barriers for ATB management and surveillance in food animals. Education for improving the awareness of the ATB resistance in food animals is required urgently in China. (Only a pilot study has been done, the discussion is not sufficient yet.)

Poster Slot

A04

16:30-16:45

Unlocking Community Partnerships Can Be Effective, Sustainable Strategies for Successful Risk Reduction Against Seasonal Dengue Fever Outbreaks: Experiences from Urban Clusters in Delhi, India

Presenter : Sumit Mazumdar
Abstract ID : A246
POSTER

Poster Slot

B04

16:30-16:45

A New Tool for Supporting Multisectoral Antimicrobial Resistance Action Planning: One Health Systems Mapping and Analysis Resource Toolkit

Presenter : Katharine Pelican
Abstract ID : A299
POSTER

Poster Slot

C04

16:30-16:45

Achieving Resilience to Emerging Infectious Diseases with the Poultry Production Systems -- Development of a Production-Led Strategy for the Progressive Control of Avian Influenza and Management of AMR in Bangladesh

Presenter : Eric Brum
Abstract ID : A438
POSTER

Poster Slot

D04

16:30-16:45

Development of Thai-Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption: A Foundation for Tracking Progress Towards Success

Presenter : Angkana Sommanustweechai
Abstract ID : A441
POSTER

Poster Slot

E04

16:30-16:45

Strengthening One Health in Uganda: An After-Action Review of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Outbreak Response

Presenter : Winyi Kaboyo
Abstract ID : A484
POSTER

Poster Slot

F04

16:45-17:00

Cross-Sectional Surveillance for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Camels and Associated Livestock in Ethiopia

Presenter : Elias Walelign
Abstract ID : A393
POSTER
As part of the epizonal approach to determine the presence or absence of MERS CoV RNA and its neutralizing antibodies in East and North Africa and the Middle East, a cross-sectional surveillance study was conducted in Ethiopia from March 2016 to September 2017. The study was jointly carried by the NAHDIC and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) under the United States Agency for International Development’s Emerging Pandemic Threats programme (USAID EPT-2). A total of 1145 camel sera were tested using Anticamel IgG ELISA. Additionally, 1697 camel nasal swab samples and 515 nasal swab samples from other species of animals (Goats, Sheep, cattle and donkeys) were also analysed by real time RT-PCR at the National Animal Health Diagnostic and Investigation Centre (NAHDIC). The study showed high level of anti MERS CoV antibodies detection in dromedary camels. However, unlike some other previous studies in the country, none of the study animals including camels were positive for MERS CoV RNA using molecular techniques. This could be associated with the brief viral shedding window period and difference in season of sample collection with the other studies.

Poster Slot

A05

16:45-17:00

One Health Approach Towards Management of the Aflatoxicosis Outbreak in Bukomansimbi District, Central Uganda

Presenter : Angella Musewa
Abstract ID : A064
POSTER

Poster Slot

B05

16:45-17:00

Reducing the Risk of Zoonotic Disease Transmission between People and Wildlife in East-Central Africa: Gorilla Doctors’ Employee Health Program

Presenter : Kirsten Gilardi
Abstract ID : A141
POSTER
In the most densely populated region of continental Africa, spanning the borders of Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), 880 endangered mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) survive in just two protected areas that are staffed by hundreds of personnel and visited by thousands of tourists annually. Close proximity and even direct contact between people and gorillas occurs daily. The risk of infectious disease transmission from people to gorillas is high, and mountain gorillas have proven to be susceptible to human pathogens. As well, the potential for disease transmission from great apes to people, while not documented to date in the Virungas, has been reported in other primate populations and in captivity, and is therefore of concern. To mitigate the potential for bidirectional disease transmission among people and mountain gorillas, Gorilla Doctors implements a preventive health care program for park personnel, researchers and their family members in close coordination with host country governments, regional hospitals and community clinics. Park personnel and research staff receive annual physical examinations, undergo routine diagnostics for wellness and communicable diseases, and they and their spouses and children are treated for gastrointestinal parasites. As well, all participants receive health and hygiene education. An assessment of this public-private partnership has demonstrated that its impact reaches beyond direct benefits to individuals and their families: it also creates opportunities for better understanding public health trends in the community and evaluating the contribution of workplace health and well-being to worker morale, and allows for the detection of emerging infectious disease at this intense and high-risk wildlife-human interface.

Poster Slot

C05

16:45-17:00

Harmonization and Flexibility in a Multi-Country Project: FAO Mers-Cov Surveillance in Camels

Presenter : Sophie von Dobschuetz
Abstract ID : A248
POSTER
The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has been conducting surveillance on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in camel populations under the United States Agency of International Develoment’s Emerging Pandemic Threats programme (USAID EPT-2) since September 2015. MERS-CoV is a significant public health threat that was first discovered in 2012. The aim of the project is to better understand the epidemiology and dynamics of this zoonotic pathogen in its animal reservoir species. Surveillance in being conducted in four countries: Egypt, Ethiopia, Jordan, and Kenya. Implementing a multi-country project has many challenges. Outputs including epidemiological and laboratory data should be harmonized, yet resources, logistics, priorities, and the structure and function of the camel sector differ in each country rendering project standardization extremely challenging. Strong collaborative relationships between global, regional, and country-level FAO offices provide the organizational structure for a successful project. Crucial to the successful implementation, however, are the country-level partnerships between FAO and national government agencies. The overall epidemiological design of the MERS-CoV surveillance provided a common framework with standardization of key elements yet flexibility for each country to develop a surveillance plan adapted to their context.

Poster Slot

D05

16:45-17:00

Implementing National Antibiotic Action Plans for Reducing Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Animals

Presenter : Thomas Shryock
Abstract ID : A303
POSTER
One Health approaches to combating antimicrobial resistant (AMR) bacteria require cooperation among the human, animal and environmental sectors. WHO, OIE and FAO have Action Plans designed to assign tasks for implementation within each country. For animal agriculture, the OIE and FAO strategy includes: AMR awareness, surveillance of antibiotic use and AMR bacteria, responsible use and good practice guidelines, governance, capacity building and international standards implementation as key activities. Adapting these high-level global approaches to fit within national settings presents many challenges. These include insufficient political support, limited funding, infrastructure challenges, negative economic impact of actions on small holders, technical capacity, shortages of trained animal health professionals, laboratory personnel and many other issues. A key learning from Europe is that a national alliance of key stakeholder groups can be an effective means to provide coordination, communication and collaboration for implementation down to the farm level. An example is the Responsible Use of Medicines in Agriculture alliance in the United Kingdom (http://www.ruma.org.uk) and at the European country level, the European Platform for Responsible Use of Medicines in Animals (http://www.epruma.eu) is also operational. Formation of similar in-country national alliances or even regional alliances of key stakeholder groups in the Asia-Pacific region could offer the potential for leveraging resources, shared learning and international cooperation. Governance, capacity building, surveillance and other national level actions could be blended with the practical aspects of on-farm implementation of good animal practices/antibiotic use guidelines, training of personnel and ways to maintain profitability for small-holder farms. In short, identification of progress or barriers in reducing AMR within countries might be enhanced by formation of stakeholder alliance organizations as has been done in Europe.

Poster Slot

E05

16:45-17:00

Temporal and Geographical Comparison Between Two Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Global Epidemics

Presenter : Paula Caceres
Abstract ID : A405
POSTER
Understanding the dissemination of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) is of high international importance due to the potential for emergence of subtypes that can infect humans coupled with the potential for rapid, aerosol spread. Global epidemics of HPAI subtype H5N8 occurred in wild and domestic birds in 2014/2015 and again in 2016/2017. This analysis presents similarities and differences between these two epidemics in terms of epidemic curves and geographical spread, based on data reported to the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) through its World Animal Health Information System (WAHIS) and identifies major intervention points to reduce the threat of HPAI. In the 2016/2017 epidemic, the number of outbreaks was 6 times larger than in 2014/2015. Statistical differences between the two epidemic curves were determined using the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test (p<0.001) followed by Mann-Whitney U test (p<0.001) for pairwise comparisons. These results showed high temporal variability in the number of H5N8 subtype outbreaks. To evaluate geographical disparities in H5N8 spread, a kernel density estimator was applied. In 2016/2017, the international spread of H5N8 was 66% larger than in 2014/2015. East Asia acted as a source of both epidemics, while regional spread was most pronounced in Europe. Differences were observed between the two epidemics. First, North America was involved only in the first epidemic, while only the second epidemic spread to the Middle East, Asia and Africa. This epidemic data indicates that East Asia was the source of both epidemics, reinforcing the necessity for continued efforts to improve early reporting of subtypes and viral phenotypes, such as virulence and transmissibility in this region. Additionally, in spite of increased efforts of Veterinary Services toward preparedness, the spread of the 2016/2017 epidemic highlights global weaknesses in the implementation of policies and practices to prevent HPAI transmission to animals and humans.

Poster Slot

F05

09:40-09:55

Sink Surveillance, An Innovative Approach to Identify HPAI and other Emerging Zoonotic Pathogens in Live Bird Markets in Bangladesh

Presenter : Eric Brum
Abstract ID : A442
POSTER

Poster Slot

A06

09:40-09:55

Proactive Case Detection and Community Participation for the Elimination of Malaria Study in Cambodia

Presenter : Shunmay Yeung
Abstract ID : A444
POSTER

Poster Slot

B06

09:40-09:55

Assessment of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Communities to Rabies in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)

Presenter : Madi Savadogo
Abstract ID : A002
POSTER
SAVADOGO Madi1, KONÉ Philippe Soumahoro1, DAHOUROU Laibané Dieudonné1, MANISHIMWE Rosine2, DOULKOM Bernard3, NÉBIÉ Larlé Raphael3, ALAMBEDJI BADA Rianatou1, AKAKPO Justin Ayayi1 1 Ecole Inter-Etats des Sciences et Médecine Vétérinaires 2 University of Rwanda 3 Direction Générale des Services Vétérinaires du Burkina Faso Abstract Rabies is an endemic zoonotic disease in the developing countries. It is one of the viral pathologies most virulent and mortals common to human and animals. For a long time, little of studies on the strategies of fight were carried out in Burkina Faso. This document presents the results of a cross-sectional household study focused on the estimated number of dogs and knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of people in the city of Ouagadougou. For data analysis, the Chi-Square test was used to know factors, which influence the level of knowledge on rabies and behaviors concerning means of fight against rabies. The majority of the people heard about rabies in animal (94.6%) and in human (71,4%). This level of knowledge drops to 51.1% when considering 6 variables of knowledge. In addition, only 13% of respondents were able to allocate 7.6 euros annually for dog‘s care. The estimate of the dog population (domestic and semi-wandering dogs) of the city indicated a dog/inhabitant ratio of 1:8.1. The strong canine presence associated to the low level of knowledge of the disease and the means of fight causes many deaths due to bites by dogs. These reports evoke the need for reinforcing the communication on the rabies in order to improve knowledge of the populations and for multi-sectorial approach for a more effective fight. Keys words: Rabies, KAP evaluation, Dogs, Behaviors, Burkina Faso

Poster Slot

C06

09:40-09:55

Decision Support for Evidence-Based Integration of Disease Control

Presenter : Rebecca Katz
Abstract ID : A068
POSTER

Poster Slot

D06

09:40-09:55

Containing Antibiotic Resistance: A One Health Chinese-Swedish Research Collaboration

Presenter : Qiang Sun
Abstract ID : A160
POSTER

Poster Slot

E06

09:40-09:55

The Survey of Poultry Market Chain and the H7N9 Risk Assessment of Wholesale LBMs in Guangxi, Yunnan, Hunan Provinces of China

Presenter : Chaojian Shen
Abstract ID : A171
POSTER
In order to better understand risk and risk mitigation of poultry H7N9, methodological approach of livestock value chain mapping and analysis was used to study the poultry market chain in Guangxi, Yunnan, Hunan provinces of China. The results show that probability of at least one infected batch introduced into the specific wholesale market monthly is 86.8%, expected batches of infected birds introduced into the market monthly are 2.1, expected number of infected birds introduced into the market monthly are 388, expected period which a infected batch is introduced into the market is 15.2 days. The wholesalers trading behaviors and biosecurity managements can’t reduce the risk of H7N9 circulating and spreading out of wholesale LBMs, including 67.8% traders mix different batches up and 83.7% kept unsold poultry in markets overnight and 37.0% trade both waterfowl and other poultry and poultry are kept in market for 2.1 days, almost 100% wholesale LBMs never conduct thorough disinfection and 90.8% don’t implement regular poultry-free rest days and 91.8% don’t disinfect vehicles and cages when it leave markets, etc.. In order to reduce the risk of introducing avian H7N9 virus to markets as well as their propagation and onward transmission to retail markets and producing sector, biosecurity guide and standard for cleaning and disinfection of wholesale LBMs, vehicles and cages leaving market should be formulated and implemented, and regular poultry-free rest days should be carried out.

Poster Slot

F06

12:00-12:15

Exposure Patterns at Animal-Human Interfaces Associated with H5N1 Influenza Upsurge in Human in Egypt During 2014-2015: An Epidemiological Investigation Under One Health Initiative

Presenter : A. Lotfi Allal
Abstract ID : A085
POSTER

Poster Slot

A07

12:00-12:15

Why Do Community Livestock Continue to Be Ignored Within Emerging Disease Surveillance Programmes? Addressing the Systemic Bias for Intensified Livestock Production Within Animal Disease Surveillance Systems

Presenter : Eric Brum
Abstract ID : A446
POSTER

Poster Slot

B07

12:00-12:15

Participatory One Health Disease Detection (PODD): A Novel Approach for Community-Based Reporting of Emerging Infectious Diseases

Presenter : Lertrak Srikitjakarn
Abstract ID : A317
POSTER
Early detection of emerging infectious diseases can act as the rate-limiting step that prevents a localized outbreak from becoming a regional epidemic or global pandemic. Public engagement plays a critical role in the detection of human and animal diseases and addresses surveillance priorities laid out by Global Health Security Agenda and International Health Regulations. Participatory One Health Disease Detection (PODD) project is designed for early outbreak detection and control using an open source digital platform. The community-owned, event-based surveillance system collects data from trained volunteers and delivers automated outbreak notification to local villages and relevant authorities. With the PODD system, volunteers use a mobile application to report suspected outbreaks and other health threats, which is complimented by a protocol for coordinating fast evaluation and response. PODD program has grown to over 4,600 volunteers over two years. Within first few months, volunteers reported more animal disease events than had been reported in the whole of Chiang Mai in the previous year. Within 16 months, 1,340 abnormal events were reported. Among those, 36 incidents of dangerous zoonotic diseases were verified. Early detection of one case of foot-and-mouth disease prevented nearly $4 million in economic losses. Data submitted to PODD may soon be used to produce a simulated epidemic curve and predict disease scenarios. PODD volunteers are also using system to report other hazards, including fraudulent medication sales, landslides, and flash floods. In July 2016, Chiang Mai University transferred ownership of PODD to Chiang Mai government, with plans to expand to Chiang Rai and Khon Kaen provinces. Authorized local government personnel are trained in operation of PODD “dashboard”, which allows them to monitor the performance of volunteers and inform relevant parties at community level about responses to outbreaks and other situations. Key: Disease surveillance, Economic impact, Emerging infectious diseases, Pandemic, One Health approach

Poster Slot

C07

12:00-12:15

Strengthening the Global Workforce to Battle Infectious Disease Threats through Universities: The One Health Workforce Project

Presenter : Katharine Pelican
Abstract ID : A295
POSTER

Poster Slot

D07

12:00-12:15

Can Behavioural Interventions Improve the Rational Use of Antibiotics in Low-and Middle-Income Countries?

Presenter : Mishal Khan
Abstract ID : A287
POSTER

Poster Slot

E07

12:00-12:15

Risk Mitigation for Influenza A (H7N9) Spread Outside of China through Informal Poultry Trade

Presenter : Qi Yu
Abstract ID : A173
POSTER
In order to know the pattern of informal trade of spent hens, and to further identify the potential risk pathways for the risk mitigation plan, we interviewed the key informants in border area, and assessed the risk of the informal way regarding the release of avian influenza (AI) viruses. We found that approximately 0.3 million spent hens per year were moved across Hekou port via boat to Vietnam in recent years, much less compared to 1 million volume per year in 2013. Economic-oriented (3 to 4 yuan/kg price difference) and consumer preference drive cross-border poultry movement. We also used the information on organization of informal trade to qualitatively evaluate the risk of release of AI viruses.

Poster Slot

F07

12:15-12:30

Epidemiology of Extend Spectrum Beta-Lactamase in Lao PDR

Presenter : Sayaphet Rattanavong
Abstract ID : A388
POSTER
Antibiotic-resistance has become a major threat to global public health, with new resistances emerging and spreading at an accelerating speed. An example is ESBL-positive multi-drug resistant Enterobacteriaceae that are an increasingly common cause of bloodstream infections worldwide. They are resistant to many first line treatments and lead to increased patient mortality and morbidity. In Asia, ESBL-positive infections are on the rise in many countries, such as Vietnam, Thailand and China, but reports from this region on ESBL resistance are relatively recent and still incomplete. Here we present data from 2010 to 2014 on bacteraemia caused by ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae at Mahosot Hospital in Lao PDR, which shares borders with Vietnam, Thailand, China, Cambodia, and Myanmar.   We used univariate and multivariate regression models to explore the risk factors associated with ESBL resistance, we analysed mortality associated with resistance, and we also described susceptibility profiles and clinical features associated with ESBL positive blood infections.    Our main results show that, while the proportion of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae has remained relatively low over time (around 14%), the proportion of ESBL-producing E. coli causing bacteraemia has increased rapidly, from 8.5% in 2010 to 26% in 2014. The main risk factors for ESBL infection were recent use of antibiotics and renal stones.   The rapid rate of resistance increase calls for urgent interventions to reduce the selection pressures for ESBL production, including a more evidence-based use of antibiotics in Lao PDR. Understanding the spread of these pathogens and underlying driving forces in different parts of Asia will help to guide effective future intervention policies across the region.

Poster Slot

A08

12:15-12:30

Collaboration Capacity of Organizations that Participated in the Response to the January 2017 H5N8 Zoonotic Disease Outbreak in Uganda

Presenter : Steven Ssendagire
Abstract ID : A018
POSTER

Poster Slot

B08

12:15-12:30

Genomic Surveillance of Pathogenic Bacteria and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Hospitals, Farms, and Communities in Lima, Peru

Presenter : Pablo Tsukayama
Abstract ID : A178
POSTER

Poster Slot

C08

12:15-12:30

Serological Biosurveillance for Spillover of Henipaviruses and Filoviruses at Agricultural and Hunting Human-Animal Interfaces in Peninsular Malaysia

Presenter : Jonathan Epstein
Abstract ID : A261
POSTER

Poster Slot

D08

12:15-12:30

Social, Economic and Behavioural Drivers of Antibiotic Use By Informal Providers in Rural West Bengal in India

Presenter : Meenakshi Gautham
Abstract ID : A458
POSTER

Poster Slot

E08

12:30-12:45

Viet Nam Coordinated Surveillance for Influenza and Other Viruses with Pandemic Potential

Presenter : Pawin Padungtod
Abstract ID : A043
POSTER
A comprehensive understanding of the burden of various priority pathogens, animal/livestock market chains and the evolution of influenza viruses in Viet Nam requires coordination of animal-human interface surveillance outputs. In 2016, U.S. CDC, FAO, WHO and WCS collaborated with Ministry of Health (MOH) and Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) to enhance detection and characterization of influenza and other viruses with pandemic potential in Viet Nam by linking components of existing influenza surveillance in domestic animals (poultry and swine), wildlife and humans. Quang Ninh and Dong Thap were selected as pilot provinces based on the animal value chain and on-going surveillance programmes in humans, domestic animals and wildlife. During the surveillance period, 10 human Severe Acute Respiratory Infection (SARI) samples per week from each sentinel hospital in Quang Ninh and Dong Thap will be tested for influenza and other priority respiratory pathogens. Human SARI samples testing negative for influenza and respiratory pathogens will be screened with consensus PCR assays for viral families with pandemic potential developed by USAID’s PREDICT project. Samples from healthy appearing poultry (200) and swine (200) in the same area will be similarly tested. Influenza viruses will be characterized by genus, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase protein and genetic sequence. Wildlife surveillance in Quang Ninh and Dong Thap will target high-risk interfaces for viral spillover from wildlife to domestic animals or humans. Wildlife surveillance sites will include live animal markets, bat guano collection sites, and wildlife restaurants. All results will be shared across sectors for joint situation analysis and risk assessment. FAO and WCS surveillance also include livestock, human and wildlife samples from Dong Nai (DN) for testing.

Poster Slot

A09

12:30-12:45

Therapeutic Potential of Bacteriophage Isolated from Sewage for Multidrug Resistant Escherichia Coli Infection in Mice

Presenter : Belayneh Getachew
Abstract ID : A051
POSTER
Bacteriophages are bacteria-specific viruses that infect and destroy their host bacteria. More recent attempts to use bacteriophages as therapeutic agents in both humans and animals have been applied with some success to treat a wide variety of antibiotic resistant pathogens. However, there is limited study on phage isolation and their therapeutic potential against multi-drug resistant pathogen in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study was conducted to isolate and evaluate therapeutic potentials of bactriophages against multi-drug resistant E.coli. Bacteriophage samples were collected from makelle dairy farm sewage and inoculated on active E.coli broth culture. After amplification of the phage, it was isolated on E.coli culture grown on tyreptic soy agar. Therapeutic potential of the isolated phage for multidrug resistant Escherichia coli were examined in mice. In this study, bacteriophage having ability of lysing E.coli was isolated. The isolated phage has rescued 83.3 % of the mice infected with multi-drug resistant E.coli when administered just after infection. The result indicated that the isolated phage has effect against multi-drug resistant E.coli. Thus the isolated phage might be used as potential therapeutic alternatives to antibiotics in human and animals after further study. Key words: Bacteriophage, E.coli, Multi -drug resistance; therapy; sewage

Poster Slot

B09

12:30-12:45

SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DIFFICULTIES FACING “ONE HEALTH” IMPLEMENTATION: MERS-COV EXPEREINCE - A SUCCESS STORY FROM SOUTHERN JORDAN

Presenter : Zuhair Ismail
Abstract ID : A052
POSTER
Early detection and appropriate response and therefore prevention of zoonotic and antimicrobial resistant (AMR) related diseases require building effective public-private-community partnerships (PPCP). In this presentation, we describe experiences and challenges faced by the Jordan team working on USAID's Emerging Pandemic Threats program during their endeavor to form One Health approaches to zoonotic diseases in line with the goals of the Global Health Security Agenda. Of particular note in Jordan is the occurrence of MERS Coronavirus in people and camels. About 80% of Jordan's total area is semi- arid which contains about 5% of the Jordanian population. Traditionally, Bedouins have a nomadic lifestyle that is based on herding livestock (camels, sheep and goats). Bedouin communities have special sensitivities involving lifestyle and culture. General cultural understanding of the Bedouins life style is vital to the success of partnerships involving human and animal health concerns. At the family level, Bedouins are protective of women family members and special training of research teams must be carried out to understand ways to communicate with Bedouins when it comes to women's contributions or participation in social engagement, farming and herding. At the tribal level, Bedouins enjoy very close family ties that span over the whole tribe. The Sheikh of the tribe is considered the leader of the tribe and effective partnerships require involvement and collaboration with Sheikh. General cultural and socioeconomic understanding of the Bedouins life style is vital to the success of partnerships involving human and animal health concerns. Bedouins also have strong relationships with their animals including camels, sheep, goats and dogs. They are often very protective of their animals and may deny collaboration with research teams unless the teams acknowledge the value of and show respect for their animals. The combination of human health professionals and veterinarians in a team can significantly help to build relationships in this situation. Care in selecting project personnel and providing cultural sensitivity training of research teams must be carried out before the launching of research programs involving special or unique communities. 

Poster Slot

C09

12:30-12:45

Evidence for Optimal Policies: Investing in Malaria Elimination in Bangladesh, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea

Presenter : Rima Shretta
Abstract ID : A260
POSTER

Poster Slot

D09

12:30-12:45

Regulating Antibiotic Distribution in Thailand

Presenter : Angkana Sommanustweechai
Abstract ID : A433
POSTER

Poster Slot

E09

12:30-12:45

Global Health Security: Tracking the Money

Presenter : Rebecca Katz
Abstract ID : A040
POSTER

Poster Slot

F09

15:00-15:15

Shifting from Live Bird Markets to Slaughterhouses to Mitigate Risk for Avian Influenza

Presenter : Thuy Nguyen
Abstract ID : A254
POSTER
Shifting from live bird markets to slaughterhouses to mitigate risk for avian influenza The role of live bird markets (LBM) in the transmission and spread of zoonotic avian influenza is well recognized. This study examines how Ho Chi Minh City has successfully shifted from selling chickens through LBMs to only sell slaughtered poultry to mitigate risks for spread and transmission of influenza and identifies lessons learned during this process. In 2004, the City effectively banned raising and selling live poultry to mitigate risk of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza. Further on, selling live poultry was allowed at restricted conditions which motivated traders to comply with new regulations. The City then focused on reducing LBMs, the 4000 small poultry slaughter points, and developing large-scale slaughterhouses in a stepwise approach over several years. In parallel, the downstream marketing channels were improved. Since 2007, the City does not have any LBMs and small slaughter points inside the City. Six industrial slaughter houses were in operation by 2015. The regular trading network was maintained with most live poultry traders shifted to trading poultry carcasses. Annual budget allocations of 1.5 million USD per year enabled the inter-sectorial inspection teams to effectively enforce regulations. Key success factors of this shift include i) strong political and financial support from the City’s People Committee and other local public agencies including public health, trade, the police, mass organizations and local authorities; ii) the establishment of Inter-sectorial teams at city, district and commune level; iii) the collaboration with the poultry supplying provinces; iii) a long-term strategy including clear plans for financial support and land allocation; iv) the dialogue and collaboration between public and private sector; v) massive and regular communication to private stakeholders and the consumers. Co-author Thi Thanh Thuy Nguyen1*, Xuan Tung Dinh2, Thi Tram Anh Tran3, Trong Tung Tran4, Van Trong Nguyen4, Phuoc Trung Nguyen5 , Pawin Padungtod1, Astrid Tripodi6

Poster Slot

A10

15:00-15:15

Understanding Socio-Economic Aspects for Sustainable Interventions to Reduce Antimicrobial Usage and Antimicrobial Resistance in Small and Household Poultry Farms in Vietnam

Presenter : Bao Truong
Abstract ID : A192
POSTER

Poster Slot

B10

15:00-15:15

SEAOHUN, a Network of Universities Supporting One Health Workforce Development in Southeast Asia

Presenter : Vipat Kuruchittham
Abstract ID : A199
POSTER
The Southeast Asia One Health University Network (SEAOHUN) was founded in 2011 with the support of the USAID Emerging Pandemic Threats Respond Project. The initial objective of the network was to strengthen university collaborations across disciplines to mitigate the risks from emerging pathogens, especially those originating at the human–animal interface. We provide an overview of the activities and programs instituted among our partner countries. The on-going mission of SEAOHUN is to link and empower a One Health regional network of academic partners with government, national and regional stakeholders in Southeast Asia. Beginning with 10 founding universities in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam, the network has expanded to include 62 universities. SEAOHUN provides multidisciplinary training opportunities related to the prevention and control of emerging zoonosis. This includes educational programs, project support, travel awards, fellowships and scholarships. In 2016, over 100 people from 9 countries were trained through SEAOHUN programs. This includes 20 travel awards to attend training and conferences, 14 scholarships for early and mid-career professionals, and leadership training at the Global Health Institute and the Global Health True Leaders Program. SEAOHUN also supports other regional countries such as Bangladesh, Cambodia, Lao, and Myanmar by offering scholarships and training opportunities. SEAOHUN closely aligns its’ work plans with those of government partners to train and strengthen the One Health workforce. In 2016, SEAOHUN supported the Engaging Intergovernmental Organizations Program and facilitated meetings with FAO, WHO, OIE, and the World Bank. These activities support regional and global efforts for healthy people, healthy animals, and a healthy environment in Southeast Asia.

Poster Slot

C10

15:00-15:15

Effect of Agricultural Pesticide Exposure to Malaria Incidence and Anopheles Susceptibility in Endemic Area in Central Java

Presenter : Renti Mahkota
Abstract ID : A226
POSTER

Poster Slot

D10

15:00-15:15

Reducing Childhood Diarrhoea Risks through Improved Environmental Sanitation: Empirical Evidence from Three Decades of Public Health Interventions in India

Presenter : Papiya Mazumdar
Abstract ID : A277
POSTER

Poster Slot

E10

15:15-15:30

Analyzing the Importance of Land Conversion as a Driver of Disease Emergence in Tropical Forests

Presenter : Carlos Zambrana-Torrelio
Abstract ID : A312
POSTER

Poster Slot

A11

15:15-15:30

The OIE's World Animal Health Information System (WAHIS) as a Tool for Monitoring Progress in the Global Strategy for the Elimination of Dog-Mediated Rabies

Presenter : Paula Caceres
Abstract ID : A410
POSTER
Epidemiological data regarding zoonotic diseases in animals is the cornerstone of disease detection and eradication. An important tool in this effort is the World Organisation for Animal Health’s (OIE) disease reporting system, World Animal Health Information System (WAHIS). Over 200 countries report data on 116 high impact animal diseases including 20 zoonoses through this unique system. Here we present the global rabies situation from 2005 through 2016 based on WAHIS and World Health Organization data and highlight areas of improvement to achieve optimal disease reporting. Human rabies causes a significant disease burden and is preventable though vaccination of dogs. Consequently there is significant international effort for global elimination of dog-mediated human rabies by 2030. Accurate data are required to monitor progress toward this goal. Based on WAHIS, the only official source of data concerning rabies in animals, the percent of countries reporting rabies in dogs significantly decreased in Europe from 43% in 2005 to 21% in 2016, (p<0.001). Several countries in the Americas and Europe have achieved freedom from dog-mediated rabies. However, in Africa and Asia, the situation remains unchanged with between 60% and 84% of countries reporting canine rabies from 2005 to 2016. These three Regions were similarly highly impacted by rabies in humans from 2014 to 2016 with 64% of the countries in Africa and 54% in Asia reporting cases. WAHIS is an essential tool for capturing surveillance data to measure the progress toward elimination of dog-mediated human rabies. To improve data quality, the OIE initiated an upgrade of WAHIS in 2016 that includes building links with human health databases, integrating genetic information for a better understanding of disease epidemiology and improvement in risk assessments. These new features will significantly improve the global reporting on rabies, improve data sharing and analysis to support policy decision making.

Poster Slot

C11

15:15-15:30

Animal, Human and Wildlife Sector Collaboration on Development of One Health Capacity: A Pilot on Integrated Prevention and Control of Emerging Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses in Indonesia

Presenter : Nurhayati Nurhayati
Abstract ID : A417
POSTER
One Health is widely accepted as a valid approach for preventing and controlling zoonoses and emerging infectious diseases (EID). A One Health (OH) approach empowers the animal, human, and wildlife health sectors to collaborate at local to global level to achieve the best health for people, animal, and environment. Development of One Health capacity and implementation mechanisms is required at local and central government decision maker level in the Ministry of Agriculture (MOA), Ministry of Health (MOH) and the Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MOEF), as 60% of EID originated in animals and 70% of these from wildlife. Commitment was built and cross-sectoral agreement was reached on capacity building for field officers in three pilot districts in Indonesia - identified as having a higher potential risk for EID. Guidelines were developed on inter-sectoral coordination using a One Health approach for local government decision makers. Field level capacities were developed covering information sharing, EID risk communication, rapid risk assessment and integrated disease outbreak investigation. Field officers were targeted in sub-district animal health centres (puskeswan), human health centres (puskesmas), and forestry field offices. Capacities of provincial and district level decision makers were built through training workshops and field simulation exercises using One Health guidelines. Conclusions of this integrated cross-sectoral training included the critical need for programme synchronisation between central and local government decision makers and technical staff, and the requirement for strong central government support. A significant result of the OH capacity development process was the establishment of strong inter-sectoral work collaboration and communication network between decision makers and technical field officers to detect, report and respond to EID, zoonoses and unusual high impact events in a timely manner.

Poster Slot

D11

15:15-15:30

Tackling “Non-Natural Disasters” through the One Health Approach in Indonesia

Presenter : Asfri Rangkuti
Abstract ID : A430
POSTER
Indonesia’s changing demographics, human travel, globalization and wildlife trade have heightened the risk of cross-species transmission and spread of pathogens, posing significant threats of zoonotic and emerging infectious disease outbreaks in the country. With these threats, recent outbreaks, and pandemics, the Government of Indonesia has developed and implemented policies and systems to prevent and mitigate impacts on human health and livelihoods. One of these is the National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB), mandated under Law Number 24/2007 to prevent and manage natural and non-natural disasters, including zoonotic and emerging infectious disease outbreaks/pandemics. The prevention and control of ‘non-natural disasters’ in Indonesia is conducted by the relevant ministries/agencies such as Ministry of Health, Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environment and Forestry, and BNPB. In practice however, coordination between and at various levels of governance, i.e. national and subnational, remains limited. To address this gap, the Coordinating Ministry for Human Development and Culture (PMK), with technical assistance from USAID-Preparedness and Response Project, developed the One Health Coordination Guidelines for Zoonoses and Emerging Infectious Diseases Outbreaks in 2017. As an institutionalized tool for the government, the Guidelines serve as a key policy reference, for coordinating activities among relevant stakeholders for ‘non-natural disaster’ preparedness and response, at national and sub-national levels. The Guidelines cover the following aspects of i) coordination for pre-outbreak, outbreak, and post-outbreak situations; ii) evaluation; and iii) budgeting. The tool was piloted in two selected provinces, drawing not only gaps, challenges and improvement areas in coordination but also identifying available resources that can be tapped at subnational level. The implementation of the Guidelines using the One Health approach will strengthen and sustain collaboration among various stakeholders, as well as coordination mechanism at all levels, in preparing and responding to ‘non-natural disasters’, thereby contributing towards national, regional and global health security.

Poster Slot

E11

POSTER LIST

Abstract ID : A123

Fecal Contamination of Water Sources In and Around Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda

Venant Nzibaza

Abstract ID : A158

Free Roaming Dog Population Dynamics, and Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) on Rabies in Major Cities of Ethiopia and Kenya

Habtamu Taddele Menghistu

Abstract ID : A163

Using Public-Private-Community Partnerships to Increase Access and Improve Efficiency of Malaria Treatment and Control in Senegal

Elaine Baruwa

Abstract ID : A230

Using Public-Private Partnership to Improve Access to Malaria Treatment and Prevention Services in Rivers State, Nigeria

Gafar Alawode

Abstract ID : A283

Tackling High-Burden Infections to Combat AMR: Quality Standards for Antibiotic Prescribing for Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Acute Exacerbation of COPD in Vietnam

Ryan Li

Abstract ID : A297

Evidence for the Normative Appeal of Collaboration: Assessing Collaborative Performance in Two Regional One Health University Networks

Kaylee Myhre Errecaborde

Abstract ID : A409

Data Integration for Proactive Animal Health Policies. Evidence from Ethiopia, Nigeria and Uganda

Alessandra Falcucci